contributors

Amy Klein

Amy Klein is a poet, writer, and songwriter who explores the psychology of healing, identity, and creativity. Her poetry has been published in PreludeSalt Hill, and the Harvard Advocate, and her essays have been published in the Best Music Writing book series. National Public Radio named her one of Ten Women Music Writers to Read Now. Amy has also released several albums of original songs on Don Giovanni Recordsmost recently the album Winter/Time. In her twenties, she toured internationally as a guitarist for the punk band Titus Andronicus and later formed the band Hilly Eye. She lives in Brooklyn and enjoys volunteering at Umoja Garden, the community garden in her neighborhood. Feel free to find her @AmyRebeccaKlein on Twitter or @AmyTiger on Instagram. 

Andy Oler

Andy Oler teaches and writes and wears a mask in public. He is Outpost Editor at The New Territory and author of Old-Fashioned Modernism: Rural Masculinity & Midwestern Literature (LSU Press, 2019). Born a Hoosier, he has been transplanted to the Sunshine State.

Jonathan McGregor

Jonathan McGregor is a writer and teacher based in Dallas, Texas. His essays and poems have appeared in publications including Religion and Literature, Gulf Coast, Image Journal, and Dappled Things. His first book, Communion of Radicals: The Literary Christian Left in Twentieth-Century America, is forthcoming in fall 2021 from LSU Press. 

Adam Fales

Adam Fales is a writer, editor, and grad student living in Chicago. His writing has appeared in Los Angeles Review of BooksPublic BooksAvidlyhominternFull Stop, and Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies

Mary Mullen

Mary Mullen writes and teaches in Philadelphia. She is the author of Novel Institutions: Anachronism, Irish Novels and Nineteenth-Century Realism (Edinburgh University Press, 2019) as well as many academic articles about realism, institutions, publics, the politics of time, colonialism. When there isn’t a pandemic, she’s a regular at the West Philadelphia YMCA.

Rithika Ramamurthy

Rithika Ramamurthy lives in Providence and writes about capitalism, feelings, and work in the nineteenth century novel and beyond. She is also the president of her labor union, has work in Los Angeles Review of Books and The Chronicle of Higher Education, and loves to party.